Dr. William Matzner

Medical Doctor, Researcher & Consultant in Simi Valley, California (USA)

Dr. William Matzner, based in Simi Valley, California, works in the area of healthcare economics consulting at Healthcare Analytics, LLC, in California. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University. He received his M.D. with Honors from Baylor College of Medicine. In 1988, he was the Solomon Scholar for Resident Research at Cedar Sinai Medical Center. Dr. Matzner subsequently was awarded a PhD in Neuro Economics from Claremont Graduate University. He is board certified in Internal Medicine and Palliative Medicine. He has researched and published extensively on the issue of reproduction and immunology in medical literature. He has been in private practice since 1989, specializing in Reproductive Immunology and Internal medicine.


Website: https://drwilliammatzner.com

Consulting Website: https://healthcareanalytics.biz

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/william-matzner-md-phd-mba-60219730

Blog: https://drwilliammatzner.blogspot.com

News: https://hype.news/dr-william-matzner/

News: https://hippocratesguild.com/dr-william-matzner

News: https://medicogazette.com/dr-william-matzner

William Lee Matzner, MD., is a recognized expert in Healthcare and Neuro Economics.

William Lee Matzner, MD., is a recognized expert in Healthcare and Neuro Economics.

Blog of William L. Matzner

William Matzner, MD (Simi Valley, California), practicing medicine since 1989, Internal Medicine and Reproductive Immunology. M.D. Baylor College of Medicine.

The Flu Shot – a few more good reasons to get one

By Dr. William L. Matzner

The flu shot is one of those issues that is discussed anew every year when flu season starts. While it is true that there are many different strains of the influenza virus, the vaccine might not necessarily protect you from getting the flu. However, there is also the broader picture that if many get the flu shot, fewer people overall will be infected. So consider getting a flu shot not just for you, but for the people around you. Dr. William Matzner, MD, based in Simi Valley, California, provides his thoughts on this issue. The complete article is available on the Blog of Dr. Matzner at https://drwilliammatzner.blogspot.com


As usual, with all health issues, if you have any doubts, review the matter with your primary care doctor to make an informed decision. The flu shot is not for everybody, and it should be age appropriate. Your doctor, with the benefit of your particular medical history, can provide personalized advice. Also, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) maintain a website with detailed information about the flu shot, and related information. See https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/keyfacts.htm 


As a general matter, we underestimate the seriousness of the flu and place it next to the common cold. This is a common misconception, but just so you know, the Influenza virus is considerably more serious in nature. The CDC estimates it has caused between 140,000 to 710,000 hospitalizations and as many as 12,000 and 56,000 deaths annually in the U.S. since 2010.  A yearly flu vaccine is the first step towards gaining protection against this disease and the CDC recommends it for everyone who is 6 months of age and older.


What will the flu do to you?


Initially, flu viruses will infect your nose, throat and lungs, but it can go on to cause a wide range of complications. While sinus and ear infections are moderate complications, Pneumonia is a serious flu complication that arises either due to the flu infection itself or if you’re simultaneously infected by bacteria as well as the flu virus. 


Other more serious complications include inflammation of the heart, brain or muscle. It can also cause multi-organ failure. An extreme inflammatory response can result in sepsis.  In the past seven flu seasons, influenza vaccination prevented around 5.3 million illnesses and 85,000 hospitalizations and as per the CDC a mere 5% increase in the number of vaccinations could have further prevented as many as 483,000 influenza illnesses. It would have stopped another two hundred thousand plus influenza-associated medical visits, and around seven thousand influenza-associated hospitalizations across the U.S.A.


Some are more at risk than others 


While anyone can get the flu, some people are susceptible to a more severe form of infection. These include:

* Children younger than 5 years old, particularly those that are younger than 2 years old

* People older than 65 years old

* People suffering from asthma or chronic lung disease

* People with neurological conditions, heart disease and those suffering from blood, liver, kidney, endocrine and metabolic disorders

* People whose immune system has recently been compromised due to an illness

* Pregnant women 


So does the flu shot really work?


Since there are different strains of the influenza virus each year, the flu vaccine needs to be modified accordingly to target the particular strain that will circulate that year. However, there is no way of knowing which strain it might be. Thus the effectiveness of the vaccine is somewhat compromised. Despite this, the CDC still heavily recommends that you get the flu vaccine as it offers at least some degree of protection even if it’s not completely effective in preventing the disease. Since the influenza virus is transmittable, it is logical to assume that if a fewer number of people get sick, then the virus won’t be able to penetrate as deeply and spread. Besides CDC, other professional medical groups like the American Academy of Pediatrics, the National Foundation of Infectious Diseases and the American Medical Association also recommend an annual flu vaccine.


There are several options for the 2018-2019 flu season, these include:

* Standard dose flu shots given into the muscle. A needle is used to inject these, but for some people between the ages of 18 and 64 years old, a jet injector can be used.

* Shots made with adjuvant. These are suitable for older people.

* Shots made the help of virus previously grown via cell culture technique.

* Shots made using vaccine production technology. These do not employ the flu virus and follow a different mechanism.

* The nasal spray vaccine, also known as the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV). This is recommended for use in non-pregnant individuals between the ages of 2 and 49 years. People with underlying medical conditions are advised against using the nasal spray flu vaccine. 


Are there side effects?


The influenza vaccine is made from an inactivated or weakened version of the influenza virus so you might experience flu-like symptoms post vaccination. These will subside however, and you won’t suffer from a full bout of the flu. There may also be some redness or swelling in the arm that was administered the flu shot, and low-grade fever. The side-effects are not really a matter of concern because really it just means that the vaccine is working and will be able to protect you from the actual virus.


As should be obvious now, last year’s flu shot work will not work. First, the immune response generated by last year’s vaccine has gradually declined. Therefore, you need to be injected with a new one for continued protection. Another thing with the flu virus is that it is constantly changing in form. The flu vaccine is also analyzed accordingly and redesigned to combat new forms of the virus each year.


I am so busy, I don’t have time to get a flu shot


Flu vaccines are easily available at doctor’s offices, clinics, pharmacies and college health centers. Many employers and schools offer them as well.  It is recommended to get a flu shot before the virus starts spreading in your community as it takes around 2 weeks for your body to build up a sufficient immune response to protect you from it. If you’re looking to get one, it is best not to wait around and get one as soon as possible to ensure maximum protection. 


Should everybody get a flu shot?


As mentioned earlier, when in doubt, as your primary care doctor who understands your particular situation. While the CDC recommends that anyone older than 6 months get the flu shot, including pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions, there are exceptions. If you’re severely allergic to the components in the flu shot then you should not get vaccinated. If you have ever had the Guillan-Barré Syndrome (An immune disorder), then consult your doctor before getting a flu shot.


One of the components involved in the manufacturing of flu vaccines are eggs but as per the CDC, even if you suffer from egg allergies, you can still get the flu shot. In case your allergies are serious and you are concerned side effects from vaccinations, please consult your doctor. 


About William L. Matzner, M.D., PhD, FACP


Dr. William Matzner works in the area of healthcare economics consulting at Healthcare Analytics, LLC, in California. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University. He received his M.D. with Honors from Baylor College of Medicine. In 1988, he was the Solomon Scholar for Resident Research at Cedar Sinai Medical Center. Dr. Matzner subsequently was awarded a PhD in Neuro Economics from Claremont Graduate University. He is board certified in Internal Medicine and Palliative Medicine. He has researched and published extensively on the issue of reproduction and immunology in medical literature. He has been in private practice since 1989, specializing in Reproductive Immunology and Internal medicine.


Website: https://drwilliammatzner.com

Consulting Website: https://healthcareanalytics.biz

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/william-matzner-md-phd-mba-60219730

Blog: https://drwilliammatzner.blogspot.com

News: https://hype.news/dr-william-matzner/

News: https://hippocratesguild.com/dr-william-matzner

Dr. William Matzner, healthcare economics consulting at Healthcare Analytics, LLC, in California

Dr. William Matzner, healthcare economics consulting at Healthcare Analytics, LLC, in California

All you need to know about hypertension

Causes, symptoms, and treatments

William Matzner, MD (Simi Valley, California), practicing medicine since 1989 in the area of Internal Medicine, has published a new information article on hypertension. This concerns many of us. According to the American Heart Association, in the United States, about 77.9 million (1 out of every 3) adults have high blood pressure. The complete article is available on the Blog of Dr. Matzner at https://drwilliammatzner.blogspot.com


Are you suffering from hypertension or is anyone you know suffering from hypertension? Well, high blood pressure is another name for hypertension and can lead to severe complications like heart disease, stroke, and even death. The pressure in the blood is the force that is exerted on the walls of the blood vessels by the blood. The blood pressure is entirely based on the resistance of the blood vessel and the work that is being done by the heart.


As per the medical records, hypertension exists when the pressure of the blood is higher than 130 over 80 millimeters of mercury (mmHg). Solely in the USA, there are about 85 million people that suffer from high blood pressure. In short, hypertension is a global health concern. Moreover, as per the WHO (World Health Organization), it is due to the growth of the processed food industry due to which the amount of salt people consume has increased worldwide. And well, salt plays a huge role in hypertension.


Types of Hypertension


Hypertension is the main name for high blood pressure. When the cause of the disease is not due to another disease, it is called essential or primary hypertension. In case it is caused due to another disease, it is called secondary hypertension. These two types are explained below in details:

· Primary Hypertension: Primary hypertension is caused due to various factors including the blood plasma volume and activity of the hormones due to which the blood volume and pressure is regulated. Another cause for this is due to environmental factors like the lack of exercise and stress.

· Secondary Hypertension: The secondary hypertension is caused due to the complication of another disease. The specific causes include CKD, obesity, sleep apnea, pregnancy, diabetes (due to nerve damage kidney disease), hyperparathyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and pheochromocytoma (adrenal gland cancer). It is also caused by Cushing syndrome, which is a disorder of the cortical-secreting adrenal glands. 


Risk factors of Hypertension


There are a lot of risk factors that usually increase the chances for a person to have hypertension as mentioned below:

· Gender: The risk of getting hypertension is the same for both males and females. But the risks are higher for men at a much younger age. The predominance usually is greater in older women.

· Alcohol and tobacco use: A person who drinks or smokes regularly has a higher risk of getting hypertension.

· Size and weight: Being obese or overweight is also a main reason.

· Ethnicity: A few ethnic groups are usually more likely to get hypertension.

· Age: It is common for people who reach the age of 60 to suffer from hypertension. This is because, with age, the blood pressure regularly increases since the arteries become narrower and stiffer due to plaque build-up.


Other things that can cause hypertension are certain diseases and medications, low potassium in the diet, and a salt-rich diet associated with fatty and processed foods. In case there is a family history for poorly managed stress and high blood pressure, then also the person from this family is more likely to suffer from hypertension sometime in the future.


Signs of Hypertension


A blood pressure monitor or a sphygmomanometer is used to measure the blood pressure in a person. In case a person has high blood pressure for a short time, it is taken as something normal since it can be due to any situation. For instance, intense exercise and acute stress usually elevates the blood pressure in every normal person, and it is not considered as a risk.


And it is due to this that the diagnosis of hypertension usually needs multiple readings that eventually display that the pressure of the blood is high consistently. The diastolic reading of 80 mmHg refers to the blood pressure when the heart relaxes and then refills the blood. And the systolic reading of 130 mmHg refers to the blood pressure when the heart pumps blood in the body.


Symptoms of Hypertension


When a person is suffering from hypertension, they would not be able to notice any symptoms. This is also a reason why hypertension is also called the "silent killer." Moreover, if it is not detected, it could damage the internal organs like the kidneys and the cardiovascular system. This makes it vital to check the blood pressure of your body regularly to stay safe from the disease.


Although there are a few cases where the person having hypertension suffers from blushing, sleeping issues, anxiety, and sweating, there are many cases where no symptoms are noticed. If the blood pressure gets to the stage where there is a hypertensive crisis, the person's nose would bleed and he/she would experience a lot of headaches.


Complications in Hypertension Cases


If hypertension persists in a person for a long time, this can cause complications like atherosclerosis. This is a case where the development of plaque results in the contraction of blood vessels. And due to this, hypertension becomes worse since the body would have to work harder to have the blood pumped to the completed body. Due to atherosclerosis, a person can get an amputation, a stroke, suffer from kidney failure, or even from a heart failure or heart attacks.


Treatment for Hypertension


Even though blood pressure is taken care of through the proper diet before it gets worse, there are many treatments options for it. The basic things that a person can do to avoid hypertension are by changing their lifestyle and begin to exercise regularly. It is highly recommended that the patients should work out for at least 30 minutes a day which should include jogging, cycling, walking, aerobic exercise, etc.


Another thing that the patients need to take care of is the management of unavoidable stress. Also, consuming alcohol or smoking would add to the stress and not reduce it. Hence, all unhealthy habits should be avoided.


Medications for Hypertension


For those who are suffering from hypertension, it is normally advised to meet a doctor and get the medications for it. Depending on the body type, situation and how much the blood pressure is, the doctor would give the desired medications. It is essential to consult a doctor since the drugs can be reactive and wrong for some people. This would lead to more harm rather than good. Hence, meeting a doctor in such cases is much better. Just make sure that you do not ignore if you have high blood pressure and take up the treatment before it becomes a chronic disease!


About William L. Matzner, M.D., PhD, FACP


Dr. William Matzner works in the area of healthcare economics consulting at Healthcare Analytics, LLC, in California. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University. He received his M.D. with Honors from Baylor College of Medicine. In 1988, he was the Solomon Scholar for Resident Research at Cedar Sinai Medical Center. Dr. Matzner subsequently was awarded a PhD in Neuro Economics from Claremont Graduate University. He is board certified in Internal Medicine and Palliative Medicine. He has researched and published extensively on the issue of reproduction and immunology in medical literature. He has been in private practice since 1989, specializing in Reproductive Immunology and Internal medicine.

Website: https://drwilliammatzner.com

Consulting Website: https://healthcareanalytics.biz

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/william-matzner-md-phd-mba-60219730

Blog: https://drwilliammatzner.blogspot.com

News: https://hype.news/dr-william-matzner/

News: https://hippocratesguild.com/dr-william-matzner

News: https://medicogazette.com/dr-william-matzner


Dr. William Matzner, healthcare economics consulting at Healthcare Analytics, LLC, in California

Dr. William Matzner, healthcare economics consulting at Healthcare Analytics, LLC, in California

Dr. William Matzner, healthcare economics consulting at Healthcare Analytics, LLC, in California

Blog of Dr. William Matzner

William Matzner, MD starts Blog with information and insights on effective health care management

Experienced doctor’s blog will address medical practice management issues that affect the delivery of cost-effective health care.


Doctor William Matzner, with decades of experience practicing medicine and a business education, started a Blog to provide on practice management, available at  https://drwilliammatzner.blogspot.com 


In this era of increasing competitiveness and innovation, measuring the effectiveness of health and wellness programs using Cost Effectiveness Analysis is of crucial importance in the health care sector. In his Blog, Dr. Matzner review the significant forces that in the last several years have been changing the way healthcare has and will continue to be delivered. The emergence of more unique ways to deliver care such as clinics incorporated into businesses and factories, the increased use of mid-level providers (nurse practitioners & physician assistants), the increase integration of technologies such as telemedicine and robotics and the shift from interventional reimbursement to outcomes reimbursement are just a few examples.


Compounding these are the ever-increasing costs of healthcare, the strain of funding Medicare on the U.S. economy, and the complications of insurance and healthcare payments under the affordable care act, ACA.


This has led to changes in how businesses intend to interface with the healthcare system going forward. CVS's acquisition of Aetna will try to leverage healthcare delivery through their pharmacy structure. United Healthcare's acquisition of DaVita hopes to leverage cost containment and resource control by directly controlling physicians. And the recently announced collaboration among Berkshire Hathaway, Amazon and J.P. Morgan Chase presents a yet unknown structure whose stated goals is improved quality and less cost. How they will implement their strategy is yet to emerge.


The big question then with these new ventures are how do organizations know what works financially and how do they track performance. In other words, how does one you track, measure and value the relationships between cost and outcomes? How can the analyst measure which methods(s) may generate better or best outcomes?


While there are no perfect answers, Dr. Matzner will offer his experience and insight on his blog. For example: A simple return on investment, ROI, calculation will not provide needed nor valid insights. However, the use of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) would provide quite useful, valid and actionable information. CEA uses decision tree models to compare not only cost outcomes but effectiveness outcomes of various treatments on patient health and even on future healthcare usage based on various current actions. It can further be used to determine how effective a set amount of money spent on a particular treatment or method will impact outcomes (i.e. willingness to pay calculation). CEA models are flexible and can incorporate a wide variety of scenarios. As opposed to Big Data, CEA makes use of Broad Data so that comparisons of treatment modalities can be evaluated using real life outcomes. It can compare effects on a discrete problem such as a cancer tumor, or on chronic ongoing diseases such as COPD or CHF.


As the delivery of effective yet profitable, or at least cost effective, healthcare becomes more challenging, methods for evaluating treatments and programs become more necessary if not essential. Methods must be implemented to evaluate these new treatments and programs once they are in place so adjustments can be made. CEA enable organizations to both initially evaluate and subsequently monitor new methods and programs in a meaningful way.


Dr. Matzner’s blog is available at available at  https://drwilliammatzner.blogspot.com 


About William L. Matzner, M.D., PhD, FACP

  

Dr. William Matzner works in the area of healthcare economics consulting at Healthcare Analytics, LLC, in California. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University. He received his M.D. with Honors from Baylor College of Medicine. In 1988, he was the Solomon Scholar for Resident Research at Cedar Sinai Medical Center. Dr. Matzner subsequently was awarded a PhD in Neuro Economics from Claremont Graduate University. He is board certified in Internal Medicine and Palliative Medicine. He has researched and published extensively on the issue of reproduction and immunology in medical literature. He has been in private practice since 1989, specializing in Reproductive Immunology and Internal medicine.


Website: https://drwilliammatzner.com

Consulting Website: https://healthcareanalytics.biz

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/william-matzner-md-phd-mba-60219730

Blog: https://drwilliammatzner.blogspot.com

News: https://hype.news/dr-william-matzner/

News: https://hippocratesguild.com/dr-william-matzner

News: https://medicogazette.com/dr-william-matzner

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Review of Cost Effectiveness of Bundled Payments

by Dr. William Matzner, MD, PhD

The cost of healthcare is a much-discussed and ongoing issue. The new article by William L. Matzner, MD reviews “Bundled Payment for Care Improvement Advanced” 


The cost of healthcare continues to be a topic of intense discussion from kitchen tables, to board rooms, to congressional hearings. Spurred by conversations and allegations, insurance companies and entities such as Medicare and Medicaid have striven to conceive alternate payment approaches besides the traditional fee for service methods on the basis of reducing costs. Dr. William Matzner has published an overview article on this issue. The complete article will be published on the Blog of Dr. Matzner at https://drwilliammatzner.blogspot.com


Capitation (a system in which providers are given a defined sum per patient regardless of how many services are rendered in a defined period of time) has been around for many years and has been fraught with complaints among providers for inconsistencies between responsibility for and authority over patient interactions. The HMO model has also been attempted in various iterations with its focus on preventive care, but most have not survived, Kaiser Permanente being an exception. Medicare has since developed a method falling between that of full capitation and fee for service—the use of bundled payments or put more descriptively, episode-based payments. In this method, reimbursement of healthcare providers (both hospitals and physicians) is based on the expected costs for clinically defined episodes of care. Since 1984, bundling payment methods have been tried and as of 2012 almost one third of medical reimbursement is now from a bundling system.


In 2018, Medicare introduced a variation called Bundled Payment for Care Improvement Advanced (BPCI Advanced). In this model there are 48 episodes, 45 inpatient and three outpatient. Again there are four payment models, with model two being the most common. Several of the medical episodes included in BPCI Advanced include CHF, COPD, Sepsis, Acute MI and Pneumonia. As every physician would know, there is a wide variation in the degree of illness and the course of therapy within these diagnoses, and there is nothing uniform about each case. 


For example, Sepsis includes three DRGs which range from uncomplicated to septic shock. Unlike elective surgery, providers cannot screen these patients to avoid complications, and in fact many of these patients develop complications and/or have significant comorbidities. All of these variables create significant variations of length in stay (LOS) and other costs associated with each hospitalization. In these cases, where there is a wide variation in costs, a need exists to employ a method to better predict these costs. 

That methods exists but seems too seldom used. It is decision tree modeling that offers both the flexibility and complexity of interaction to more accurately predict costs than just a linear model which is commonly used. 


Since diseases such as sepsis, COPD and CHF can become a complex affair with many possible outcomes that would affect costs, this type of modeling lends itself to such an analysis. Armed with better predictability results, providers are better able to defend both real costs and to negotiate for more fairly applied payment schemes. 


If your objective is to provide the best decision-making for your organization and take a global view of your business, expanding your sights beyond ROI, and educating other decision-makers, Cost Effectiveness Analysis can make your organization more competitive and more profitable.


William Matzner, MD. is a recognized expert in Healthcare and Neuro Economics. With a Ph.D. in Economics, MBA and Medical Doctor degree, Dr. William Matzner will provide you with expert analysis on health and wellness programming, populations health management, disease management, new program development, facility development, equipment acquisitions, and other healthcare programs, acquisitions and initiatives. For more information about cost effectiveness analysis and improved financial accountability for your organization, visit Dr. Matzner at http://healthcareanalytics.biz. Dr. Matzner is also available for speaking engagements, retreat presentations and topic specific addresses. 


Website: https://drwilliammatzner.com

Consulting Website: https://healthcareanalytics.biz

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/william-matzner-md-phd-mba-60219730

Blog: https://drwilliammatzner.blogspot.com

News: https://hype.news/dr-william-matzner/

News: https://hippocratesguild.com/dr-william-matzner

News: https://medicogazette.com/dr-william-matzner

Dr. William Matzner works in the area of healthcare economics consulting at Healthcare Analytics.

Dr. William Matzner works in the area of healthcare economics consulting at Healthcare Analytics.